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in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
the kind of decisions that had to be made during katrina and other events. instead of having a set standard of care, even if it's an altered or austere standard of care, what we want to have is good decision framework. until you are in the situation you can't determine what you would actually be doing and what resources are still available. >> do we have other questions from our audience? one final question and this is for our civilians. you got to see all kinds of cool stuff yesterday down at moffat's field. i want to see if there's one or two that stuck out. >> i think the c130 definitely blew me away, the fact it can transport 92 people, patients, was incredible. the other 1 that stands out is the mobile decon patient, that it can decontaminate a patient that was not able to stand. >> the team from the hospital that i was with and the other hospitals really looked at what were their hands on capabilities and some of the things that stood out the most is a portable oxygen generator that sits in the corner of the shock trauma platoon unit and doesn't have to be hooked up to our large l
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some p
the way from 9-11 through katrina to whatever the next catastrophe is going to be. we live in a nuclear age. who would have predicted the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the worl
and local platforms, whether it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfe
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about the partnerships an
want one for home you want for 5 days. our old standard was 3. after hurricane katrina we participate 5 days. for work a lot of work places have supplies. make sure they do. if they don't keep one for yourself and may be your coworkers. a first aid kit a flashlight any pair of shoes in case you are driving you have to get out. water. how much water do you need for 72 hours? if you use the hot water heater you have to turn off the gas. if you don't stop the gas it will light up and cause a little explosion or fire. vegetables. the back of the tank you go up and treat water with bleach. but remember, it should be a fresh pot of bleach. once you open bleach it looses the effectiveness of the bleach. one capful for a gallon of water. wait 20 minutes. wash your hands. wait a half-hour, to drink it, tastes like pool water but it kills germs. >> what kind of food do you want to keep? open the fridge don't open it too much. eat all perishable food first. you want to save emergency supplies. what emergency supply food do you want to /kaoepl. keep? energy bars. dry food. canned vegetables. can
? please come forward. >> i'm katrina, on the board of the alamo square neighborhood association. i wanted to confirm dennis's comment that we are very supportive of this. we have been following it closely. we are excited we are going to get a new irrigation system and conserve more water and will work closely with community who's communicate what is going on as the various stages happen and make that go more smoothly. we are meeting with the project manager, marvin ye, and talking about how this will affect replanting and tree removal. what we can do to really take our park to the next level. and make good decisions now as this is designed so we can have a beautiful park in 100 years. thank you. >> thank you. >> any other public comment on this item? >> good morning, commissioners. thank you for having this item on your agenda today. my name is gus hernandez, editor of the alamo square news letter. i also want to offer my support for this irrigation plant, long overdue. like commissioner bonia said. you know, we are very excited about . this we are going to be partnering with your departm
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)

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